28
Mar
2017
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Get Out

Get Out

Chris Washington, a young black photographer is invited to meet his white girlfriend’s parents on their country estate. As the weekend unfolds, he slowly learns that all is not what it seems in their portrait of domestic harmony and inclusivity.

‘Get Out’ knows exactly what it’s going for...

In presenting itself as a straight-out horror movie, ‘Get Out’ knows exactly what it’s going for. From the very beginning, it broadcasts its horror credentials with loud winks and scares. However that said, you can’t help but be amused by these deliberately self-consciousness movie references. You see, where ‘Get Out’ excels is in marrying this self-conscious style of film making with the discomfort of its on-screen characters. For as Chris becomes more suspicious of his racist hosts, ‘Get Out’s’ ham-fisted horror perfectly mirrors your sense of disbelief with his.

In the lead role of Chris, Daniel Kaluuya both sells and steals the movie. In a highly believable performance, he regularly steers the action into drama thereby giving ’Get Out’ the credible underpinning it needs. Whilst ’Get Out’ is definitely a break-through comedy drama for director Jordan Peele, that success also rests squarely on the shoulders of Daniel Kaluuya’s strong performance.

In the end, ’Get Out’s’ main horror isn’t in the blood and guts variety – that comes later. Its main horror is in racial prejudice and how uncomfortable it can make people feel. It’s this thought-provoking premise that provides this satire with its steel pulse and will keep you watching as your disbelief mounts with the tension. It’s definitely hypnotic stuff.

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